Ask the Water Bottle

This newsletter feature, previously "Ask the Mole", answers questions on a variety of  POGIL topics. The feature is written by POGIL Executive Director, Rick Moog. Do you have a question for the POGIL Water Bottle? Let us know in an email at marcy.dubroff@pogil.org.

Photo Credit: Malia Turner of Coupeville, WA - On the shore of Salt Pond Park in Eleele, Kauai.

How do I implement POGIL in my Classroom?

There is no single way to implement POGIL in the classroom and every implementation has unique characteristics that can influence how and whether particular goals are achieved. However, there are 4 core characteristics that must be present in order for a classroom environment to be considered a POGIL implementation:

  • Students are expected to work collaboratively, generally in groups of 3 or 4.
  • The activities that the students use are POGIL activities, specifically designed for POGIL implementation.
  • The students work on the activity during class time with a facilitator present.
  • The dominant mode of instruction is not lecture or instructor-centered; the instructor serves predominantly as a facilitator of student learning.

What's the difference between the Activity Writing Track and the Writer's Retreat?

POGIL's activity writing track is designed for experienced POGIL practitioners who have attended any one of the following: Virtual Fundamentals of POGIL workshop, a summer 3-day POGIL workshop, or a 1-day POGIL workshop. The workshop consists of several team activities and individual assignments throughout the week. Despite being in a virtual format, this is a very learner-centered, active-learning workshop. There will be small homework assignments given at the end of the first two sessions. Participants will work on writing an activity of their choice throughout the week. Facilitators will be available to provide feedback and suggestions on Thursday through individual coaching sessions as needed.  This is a great way to begin the writing process.

The Writers' Retreat provides an opportunity for individuals or small teams to spend focused time on developing, writing, and improving POGIL activities that they have begun writing with the mentorship of experienced POGIL author coaches. The 4-day agenda (plus a 2-hour orientation) includes workshop sessions focused on activity authoring, feedback sessions, and ample time for writing and interacting with other authors and author coaches. For more information, contact Jen Perot at jen.perot@pogil.org.  

https://pogil.org/news/ask-the-mole?featureType=ask-the-mole3

What are POGIL Learning Communities?

POGIL Learning Communities are an initiative in the POGIL Project to broaden participation, deepen community, and create equitable pathways to leadership opportunities in the POGIL Project. The goal of this program is to support a diverse set of new practitioners through their beginning years of implementation to improve retention of underrepresented instructors in the POGIL Project.

A professional learning community is a group of practitioners that meets on a regular basis to share expertise and collaborate to improve their teaching. POGIL Learning Communities are designed to support new practitioners throughout their first years of implementation, to identify available resources to promote sustainability, to improve pedagogical practices, and to build connections to the POGIL community.  For more information, click here.

What does The POGIL Project do to promote diversity, equity and inclusion?

The POGIL Project values the creation of inclusive learning environments for students and instructors. Furthermore, The POGIL Project “envision(s) an educational system that prepares every learner to enrich the world by thinking critically, solving problems, working effectively with others, and experiencing the joy of discovery.” Reaching every learner requires that we intentionally strive to increase the diversity and inclusivity of the POGIL community and the students it serves. The Project cannot attain these aspirations without being intentional, explicit, systemic, and ongoing in its efforts focused on diversity, equity and inclusion. We acknowledge that we are striving toward an ideal, and we recognize that effective applications of principles of diversity, equity and inclusion require a persistent, continual revision of existing frameworks; it is not a destination with a clearly defined stopping point. We have created a guiding principles document to inform an effective application of DEI ideals.  Visit https://pogil.org/about-the-pogil-project/guiding-principles for more information.

The mole hangs up his lab coat

After 10 wonderful years of answering questions, our beloved Mole will be hanging up his lab coat, putting away his beakers, and finally taking some time for himself. The Mole is retiring! Luckily for us, taking the Mole’s place is the POGIL Water Bottle, who will be happy to continue answering questions and keeping our wonderful community informed! You will still be getting the same type of helpful answers coming from the Water Bottle that you came to rely on from the Mole! Let’s all welcome the POGIL Water Bottle with open arms into this new position it is accepting! 

What should I keep in mind when I get back to face-to-face instruction?

July, 2021

The COVID-19 pandemic changed our traditional view of what education should be and transformed it to include multiple methods of delivery. The use of online tools has been revolutionary for many, and now, as we transition back to face-to-face learning, many instructors are hoping to incorporate these tools into their in-person/synchronous instruction. Tools such as Jamboard, breakout rooms, and Google slides, to name a few, have been critical to keeping students on track and interacting with each other and instructors are hoping to find ways to keep using them. Thus, while a return to the classroom will be welcome, continuing to utilize and incorporate these online tools will make for a more dynamic experience for both instructors and students. It is also important to remember that a mere return to physical teamwork should include effective implementation of cooperative learning techniques, which contain at least three common characteristics—the techniques should be motivational, effective, and cognitive. Through these techniques, each student will be able to encourage their teammates to collaboratively reach group goals and to gain confidence in their own abilities while still being challenged academically. The instructor should serve as a coach/adviser by facilitating key interactions among students that can further lead students to their own deeper understandings and encourage the construction of new and refined knowledge.

I am trying to connect with other POGIL practitioners outside of meetings and events. How can I do this?

May 2021

One way to connect with other practitioners is through The Project’s new Facebook page that is designed to bring together POGIL practitioners so that they have an opportunity for shared learning, a chance to discuss POGIL practice, and the ability to develop and deepen relationships with others in the POGIL community. Conversations range from “how do you do this in your classroom” to ads for various positions in different regions. With about 400 members, the POGIL Practitioners page is a great place to find the latest news and resources that will help you in your own classrooms, as well as connect and stay connected with other POGIL practitioners outside of meetings and events. Check it out at https://www.facebook.com/groups/POGIL/?ref=pages_profile_groups_tab&source_id=124666176320 

Does POGIL have any resources for teaching online?

February 2021

The POGIL Project offers a variety of resources geared toward helping educators with online teaching. We have a variety of webinars and recordings where community members speak about their own experiences with online teaching and what has helped them in their classrooms while online. We also have a variety of helpful links and tips on this page to help you navigate the virtual classroom experience.

To access these resources, visit our special page at https://pogil.org/teaching-online-during-the-covid-19-crisis. We also encourage you to join our POGIL Practitioners Facebook page at https://en-gb.facebook.com/groups/POGIL/, for a community where people come together to share ideas and ask questions.

Is the POGIL pedagogy still as effective online as it is in a normal classroom setting?

Winter 2020

Taking courses online has proven highly effective among students as it gives them the ability to practice POGIL activities throughout the week at their own pace, while still having a “deadline” to complete the assignments. It is a different experience but the beautiful thing about POGIL is that it can be applied in new creative ways that will still accommodate student needs. We understand the difficulties that have arisen in education amidst COVID and The POGIL Project is committed to supporting its practitioners during this difficult time. Feel free to reach out and check out our resources that can help you best manage your POGIL classroom online.

https://pogil.org/teaching-online-during-the-covid-19-crisis 

Why go beyond STEM with POGIL?

Fall 2020

Employing the POGIL method in any discipline provides the opportunity to impart transfer skills; teach process skills and social learning; improve mastery of content, skills, and depth of learning; increase course exam scores, grades, and standardized test scores; increase student perceptions of the value of learning in teams; and lower course attrition rates. The fact that process skills help students transfer acquired procedural skills to new conceptual and social situations is the most valid reason to employ POGIL across disciplines. These process skills are also in demand by employers and therefore should be included in any university discipline, in STEM disciplines, in any grade level, and beyond.


Excerpted from POGIL: An Introduction to Process Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning for Those Who Wish to Empower Learners, Edited by Shawn Simonson, Stylus Publishing, 2019.

What is the GI of POGIL?

Winter 2019/2020

The Guided Inquiry (GI) of POGIL is structured inquiry or identifying inquiry. A POGIL activity uses a learning cycle to support students in constructing knowledge about the disciplinary content related to a larger concept or driving question. Both the question and the desired learning outcomes for students drive the design of the activity. The activity structure is designed such that the learning-cycle components scaffold student learning through the activity. Once students complete the activity, they are able to answer the overarching question posed by the instructor as well as construct meaning of new knowledge and understanding. In this inquiry, the instructor no longer takes the role of being the deliverer of information, but rather takes the role of a facilitator of ideas and learning which enables student learning. The guided inquiry and process components are highly integrated within the classroom implementation of POGIL, and the effective implementation of guided inquiry requires the active engagement of students in constructing ideas and mastering material.

Why are POGIL methods particularly well suited to STEM?

Fall 2019

The POGIL methodology is an effective guided inquiry strategy with a proven track record or enhancing student learning. In addition, the guided inquiry method of teaching matches well with the inquiry necessary for conducting science. Inquiry methods in the POGIL model follow the learning cycle components of exploration, concept invention, and application, and require students to make use of a set of process skills to learn the relevant material. The learning cycle matches well to the traditional model of the scientific method. In the exploration phase, the activity proves and asks questions about a phenomenon and leads to concept invention, analogous to analyzing data and developing a hypothesis. Students then move on to application, or hypothesis testing, and ask more questions.

Why should I use POGIL activities?

Summer 2019

When selecting and/or writing POGIL activities, an initial step is to think about why the activity is being used. A POGIL activity is designed to guide students as they construct a deep understanding of a concept and, at the same time, to help them develop process skills. A POGIL activity is appropriate for the following:

 • A new and important concept, particularly a threshold concept (Meyer & Land, 2003) that students often struggle with, but must master to continue with the subject. 

• A concept in which students are likely to be confused of struggle due to inexperience, lack of knowledge, or misconceptions.

 • The start of a new unit or topic to orient students to new ideas, problems, or approaches. 

Instructors should also recognize when not to use POGIL activities. Each activity is designed to be used by a team of students with active facilitation by an instructor. Thus, activities should not be assigned as homework or used without facilitation. In addition, POGIL activities may not be the best tool for reviewing concepts with which students are already familiar.